Halton Regional Police Service
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Marihuana

Frequently Asked Questions

The Halton Regional Police Service, in collaboration with the Region of Halton Health Department, has created a collection of Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) regarding how Bill C-45 will regulate the possession, distribution, consumption and cultivation of cannabis. Additionally, there is a wealth of information included regarding the health risks associated with cannabis.

Please click here for our printable (PDF) version of these Frequently Asked Questions

GENERAL QUESTIONS

What is medical cannabis?

Medical cannabis is subject to different rules than recreational cannabis.

The production and sale of medical cannabis is regulated exclusively by the Health Canada (a federal agency).

What is non-medical cannabis?

Non-medical cannabis = "recreational cannabis"

What is Bill C-45?

Bill C-45, the Cannabis Act, is a federal bill that has received Royal Assent, but will not come into effect until October 17, 2018. Bill C-45, once in effect, will regulate and restrict the production, distribution and sale of cannabis.

The stated objectives of this legislation are to prevent young persons from accessing cannabis, to protect public health and public safety by establishing strict product safety and product quality requirements and to deter criminal activity by imposing serious criminal penalties for those operating outside the legal framework. The Act is also intended to reduce the burden on the criminal justice system in relation to cannabis.

Until October 17, 2018, it remains illegal to buy, possess or use cannabis for anything other than authorized medical or research purposes.

How does Ontario's Cannabis Act differ from Bill C-45?

Ontario's Cannabis Act received Royal Assent on December 12, 2017.

On and after October 17, 2018, adults 19 years and older will be able to purchase, use, possess and grow cannabis for non-medical purposes. This is the same minimum age for the sale of tobacco and alcohol in Ontario.

Until October 17, 2018, it remains illegal to possess, consume or distribute cannabis for anything other than authorized medical or research purposes.

At the time of publication, the provincial government is taking a hybrid approach to cannabis sales, whereby as of October 17, 2018, the legal sale of cannabis will only be allowed online, through the Ontario Cannabis Store website. After April 1, 2019, the province will allow non-medical cannabis to be sold in private retail stores.

CULTIVATION

How many cannabis plants can I grow?

For recreational cannabis users, the legislation will permit four cannabis plants per residential premise (indoors and/or outdoors). Until October 17, 2018, it remains illegal to grow cannabis for anything other than authorized medical or research purposes.

Individuals with a prescription to use cannabis may grow it themselves in quantities stipulated by that prescription. Additional details are available here: https://bit.ly/2swrnpw.

Is each person in my residence allowed to have up to four plants, or is there a household limit?

On and after October 17, 2018, there will be a household limit of four cannabis plants for recreational users.

I rent a property. Can I grow cannabis plants in my unit?

Landlords will be able to prohibit growing of cannabis on their property.

I own a property. Can I stop my tenants from growing plants?

Landlords will be able to prohibit growing on their property.

I live in a multi-residential unit. Can I still grow plants?

Landlords will be able to prohibit growing on their property. This will include tenant boards for owner-occupied units.

I have a medical cannabis license, once the new legislation is in place, will any cultivation rules change for me on October 17, 2018?

If a health care professional has already authorized you to use cannabis for medical reasons, you will still be required to register under the Access to Cannabis for Medical Purposes Regulations (ACMPR) to produce cannabis for your own medical purposes. Details here: https://bit.ly/2MfD7sy.

Who can I call if I think someone is growing more cannabis plants than they are allowed?

If someone is growing more cannabis than the legislation allows, and you wish to report this, you can do so by contacting Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-8477, online at www.haltoncrimestoppers.ca or by contacting the Halton Regional Police Service non-emergency line at 905-825-4777.

USE / CONSUMPTION

Where can I use non-medical cannabis?

The government has proposed legislation that, if passed, would provide the following rules for using cannabis, both medical and recreational.

Where you could smoke and vape cannabis*

  • Private residences – this does not include residences that are also workplaces (e.g. long-term care and/or retirement homes)
  • Many outdoor public places (e.g. sidewalks, parks)
  • Designated guest rooms in hotels, motels and inns
  • Residential vehicles and boats that meet certain criteria (e.g. have permanent sleeping accommodations and cooking facilities, and are parked or anchored)
  • Scientific research and testing facilities (if the cannabis use is for scientific research and testing purposes)
  • Controlled areas in:
    • long-term care homes
    • certain retirement homes
    • residential hospices
    • provincially-funded supportive housing
    • designated psychiatric facilities or veterans’ facilities

*Additional restrictions on smoking and vaping may exist in municipal bylaws, lease agreements, and the policies of employers and property owners.

Where you could not smoke or vape cannabis

Indoors

You would not be able to smoke or vape cannabis in:

  • indoor common areas in condos, apartment buildings and university/college residences
  • enclosed public places and enclosed work places
  • non-designated guest rooms in hotels, motels and inns

Schools and places where children gather

You would not be able smoke or vape cannabis:

  • at school, on school grounds, and all public areas within 20m of these grounds
  • on children’s playgrounds and public areas within 20m of playgrounds
  • in child care centres, or where an early years program is provided
  • in places where home child care is provided – even if children aren’t present
  • Hospitals, hospices, care homes and other facilities

You would not be able to smoke or vape cannabis:

  • within 9m from the entrance or exit of hospitals (public/private), psychiatric facilities, long-term care homes, independent health facilities
  • on outdoor grounds of hospitals (public/private) and psychiatric facilities
  • in non-controlled areas in long-term care homes, certain retirement homes, provincially-funded supportive housing, designated psychiatric or veterans’ facilities, and residential hospices

Publicly owned spaces

You would not be able to smoke or vape cannabis in publicly-owned sport fields (not including golf courses), nearby spectator areas and public areas within 20m of these areas.

Vehicles and boats

You would not be able to consume cannabis (smoking, vaping, eating) in a vehicle or boat that is being driven or is at risk of being put into motion.

Other outdoor areas

You would not be able to smoke or vape cannabis:

  • in restaurants and on bar patios and public areas within 9m of a patio
  • on outdoor grounds of Ontario government office buildings
  • in reserved seating areas at outdoor sports and entertainment locations
  • grounds of community recreational facilities, and public areas within 20m of those grounds
  • in sheltered outdoor areas with a roof and more than two walls which the public or employees frequent, or are invited to (e.g. a bus shelter)

My neighbour is smoking cannabis in their yard, and my kids are being exposed to the smoke, what can I do?

You are encouraged to share your concerns with your neighbours so that the matter can be resolved between both parties. If appropriate, a third party mediator could be retained to assist in the resolution.

Such a scenario would not be considered a police matter.

What are the laws about driving after consumption of cannabis?

Drug-impaired driving has been illegal since 1925 and will remain illegal after the new legislation comes into effect.

Please refer to the FAQ on “Road Safety” for additional details regarding the detection and enforcement of drug-impaired driving.

Who do I call if I believe someone is driving while impaired by cannabis?

Drug-impaired driving is a crime in progress. Call 9-1-1 immediately if witnessed.

POSSESSION

What is the legal age for purchasing cannabis or cannabis products?

On and after October 17, 2018, the legal age for purchasing cannabis in Ontario will be 19 years of age.

How much cannabis can I carry on my person?

On and after October 17, 2018, an individual who is 19 or older will be permitted to carry a maximum of 30 grams (about one ounce) of dried legal cannabis or its equivalent in public.

The new legislation will decriminalize youth (12 to < 18 years) possession of up to 5 g of dried legal cannabis, however these amounts may be subject to seizure by law enforcement. Amounts exceeding 5 g will be addressed under the Youth Criminal Justice Act, including youth diversion.

Until October 17, 2018, it remains illegal to possess cannabis for anything other than authorized medical or research purposes.

Where will an individual legally be permitted to transport cannabis in a vehicle or boat?

It will be illegal to operate a motor vehicle or boat that contains cannabis in Ontario unless the cannabis "is packed in baggage that is fastened closed or is not otherwise readily available to any person in the vehicle or boat."

If a police officer has reasonable grounds to believe that cannabis is being contained in a vehicle or boat in contravention of that rule, they will be able to search the vehicle, and any person found in it without a warrant.

These cannabis transport rules will also apply to medical cannabis.

I think someone is selling the cannabis they are growing. How would I report this?

The illegal sale of cannabis can be reported by contacting Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-8477 or by contacting the Halton Regional Police Service non-emergency line at 905-825-4777.

Can I give cannabis I grow to a friend, for free?

Under the new legislation, you will be able to share up to 30 grams of dried legal cannabis and legal cannabis products with other adults (19 years of age or older).

What is 1 gram of dried cannabis equivalent to?

For the purposes of the new legislation, one gram of dried cannabis is considered equivalent to:

  • 5 g of fresh cannabis
  • 15 g of edible product
  • 70 g of liquid product
  • 0.25 g of concentrates (solid or liquids)
  • one cannabis plant seed

I have a medical cannabis license. Once the new legislation is in place, will the same rules about possession apply to me?

If a health care professional has already authorized you to use cannabis for medical reasons, the Access to Cannabis for Medical Purposes Regulations that currently apply to you will continue to apply to you.

Who can I call if I think someone is carrying more cannabis than the legislation allows?

One can report this by contacting Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-8477 or www.haltoncrimestoppers.ca or by contacting the Halton Regional Police Service non-emergency line at 905-825-4777.

PURCHASING

When it is legal, where will I be able to purchase recreational cannabis?

When it becomes legal, only people 19 years of age and over will be able to purchase cannabis.

At the time of publication, the provincial government is taking a hybrid approach to cannabis sales, whereby as of October 17, 2018, the legal sale of cannabis will only be allowed online, through the Ontario Cannabis Store website. After April 1, 2019, the province will allow non-medical cannabis to be sold in private retail stores.

I have a medical cannabis license, once the new legislation is in place, do the same rules about purchasing apply to me?

If a health care professional has already authorized you to use cannabis for medical reasons, the Access to Cannabis for Medical Purposes Regulations that currently apply to you will continue to apply to you.

Who can I call if I think a store is selling cannabis or cannabis products to minors?

You are encouraged to report the sale of cannabis or cannabis products to minors by contacting Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-8477 or www.haltoncrimestoppers.ca or by contacting the Halton Regional Police Service non-emergency line at 905-825-4777.